Common Errors And Misconceptions In Writing Business Card Titles

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What's in a title? A lot, especially if it is placed on a business card. Business card titles are one of the main highlights of this identity card. Look at how much information is written there. There's your name, company or organization, phone number, cellphone number, office address, email address and your title, of course. Given the very limited space of business cards, usually set at 2" x 3.5", you need to put in only the most significant information about you. And these are not just to tell people about your contact details. It is also a powerful tool to build a big impression, http://alicewbryant.somebody.io/ especially if you have a nice title to go with a sleek business card. Notice that you really can't include anything much other than the data mentioned above. This means that, unlike brochures, postcards, flyers and other advertising tools, you cant say much about who you are, what you do and what you are offering. With business cards, recipients pretty much have a lot of deducing to do from the info found in the card, especially from the business card titles and logos. Having an office space in a posh and renowned commercial district leaves a mark. A person with a degree in Medicine is a doctor, and earns the suffix M.D., but should you write 'Dr. 1. Do not include both your degree and your title. For doctors, either write 'John Doe, M.D.', or 'Dr. John Doe'. If you are done with your doctorate degree, write 'Dr. John Doe' or 'John Doe, PhD'. Lawyers, on the other hand, can write either 'Atty.



Five states - North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin - do not empower their governors to make temporary appointments, relying exclusively on the required special election provision in the Seventeenth Amendment. Nine states - Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Texas, Vermont, and Washington - provide for gubernatorial appointments, but also require a special election on an accelerated schedule. The remaining thirty-six states provide for gubernatorial appointments, "with the appointed senator serving the balance of the term or until the next statewide general election". In six states within the final category above - Arizona, Hawaii, Maryland, North Carolina, Utah, and Wyoming - the governor must appoint someone of the same political party as the previous incumbent. In 2004, Alaska enacted legislation and a separate ballot referendum that took effect on the same day, but that conflicted with each other. The effect of the ballot-approved law is to withhold from the governor authority to appoint a senator.



Because the 17th Amendment vests the power to grant that authority to the legislature - not the people or the state generally - it is unclear whether the ballot measure supplants the legislature's statute granting that authority. As a result, it is uncertain whether an Alaska governor may appoint an interim senator to serve until a special election is held to fill the vacancy. The Constitution requires that senators take an oath or affirmation to support the Constitution. 2018, over 50 senators were millionaires. Along with earning salaries, senators receive retirement and health benefits that are identical to other federal employees, and are fully vested after five years of service. Senators are covered by the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) or Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS). FERS has been the Senate's retirement system since January 1, 1987, while CSRS applies only for those senators who were in the Senate from December 31, 1986, and prior.



As it is for federal employees, congressional retirement is funded through taxes and the participants' contributions. Under FERS, senators contribute 1.3% of their salary into the FERS retirement plan and pay 6.2% of their salary in Social Security taxes. The amount of a senator's pension depends on the years of service and the average of the highest three years of their salary. The starting amount of a senator's retirement annuity may not exceed 80% of their final salary. According to the convention of Senate seniority, the senator with the longer tenure in each state is known as the "senior senator"; the other is the "junior senator". This convention does not have official significance, though seniority generally is a factor in the selection of physical offices and in party caucuses' assignment of committees. The Senate may expel a senator by a two-thirds vote. Fifteen senators have been expelled in the Senate's history: William Blount, for treason, in 1797, and fourteen in 1861 and 1862 for supporting the Confederate secession.



At one end of the chamber of the Senate is a dais from which the presiding officer presides. The lower tier of the dais is used by clerks and other officials. One hundred desks are arranged in the chamber in a semicircular pattern and are divided by a wide central aisle. The Democratic Party traditionally sits to the presiding officer's right, and the Republican Party traditionally sits to the presiding officer's left, regardless of which party has a majority of seats. In this respect, the Senate differs from the House of Commons of the United Kingdom and other parliamentary bodies in the Commonwealth of Nations and elsewhere. Each senator chooses a desk based on seniority within the party. By custom, the leader of each party sits in the front row along the center aisle. Forty-eight of the desks date back to 1819, when the Senate chamber was reconstructed after the original contents were destroyed in the 1812 Burning of Washington. Further desks of similar design were added as new states entered the Union. It is a tradition that each senator who uses a desk inscribes his or her name on the inside of the desk's drawer.